• Tue, Jul 6 2010

3 Steps on How To Re-wear an Outfit Inspired by Queen Elizabeth II

We all have that favorite dress, top or pair of jeans that we’ve worn way too many times. So many times that our friends need to intervene and subtly drop hints. Hints that we intentionally ignore. But I think we can all learn a lesson from Queen Elizabeth II who showed us how to not only re-wear a favorite outfit, but how to re-create it as well.

1. Find the right article of clothing. Not every piece can be transformed. Your favorite pair of jeans might not be eligible to become jean shorts. And that top with all those sequins? Well, you never should have bought that in the first place. Make sure it’s a relatively simple top (ie: a white shirt with a small design, or a classic denim jacket).

2. Keep up with the times. As shown on Queen Elizabeth, birds and flower patchwork on dresses is certainly out. The Queen made a move in the right direction by going with Swarovski crystals instead, which embellish one whole arm of the dress.

3. Make sure you’ll actually wear your new design. Queen Elizabeth obviously didn’t make this dress herself. She probably had Tom Ford sew on the crystals himself. But for us, we can’t be certain that when we apply crystals to our black mini skirt, we’ll actually wear it. Fashion is a risk and I’m no designer. So don’t ruin that Alice and Olivia black sheath dress, instead, go to town on your American Apparel one.

This just goes to show that even Queen Elizabeth can be frugal sometimes. So next time you need a new outfit, put away your wallet and take out that glue gun, after all it is a recession, people!

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  • Katiej

    Look – you can even keep the same shoes and hairstyle! But then you have to change your tiara and also your (likely real) jewelry.

  • AnneGG

    Imagine! Wearing the same tiara with the same dress, TWICE?! Quelle horreur!

    In all honesty, I love that the Queen personalized this dress first for Trinidad and Tobago and then for Canada. Seriously, recession chic.