• Wed, Dec 1 2010

Would You Use Social Media To Get Fashion Discounts?

Gap announced today that they’re partnering with social media application Foursquare to offer discounts to shoppers who follow the brand. If you have a smartphone and follow The Gap, you can get a 30 percent discount off of one full-priced item. Gap is pushing their initiative hard, with plenty of online ads on sites like Mashable and Gawker. Mashable’s Adam Ostrow, in a post about the Gap/Foursquare initiative, wrote:

We’re starting to see more and more social integrations within banner ads — most commonly perhaps in the form of Facebook (Facebook) “like” buttons — but this is the first time we’ve seen it with Foursquare as the call to action. Foursquare may have a significantly smaller userbase, but given the ads can directly drive foot traffic with a discount, we imagine the results could inspire others to emulate the format.

As a more-avid-than-I-should-admit Foursquare user, I’m happy that something I do all the time anyway can now net me discounts. I’ve already seen similar Foursquare discounts at Ann Taylor and Catherine Malandrino (although the latter’s may only have applied during Fashion’s Night Out). Jimmy Choo also had a Foursquare “treasure hunt”-style contest in London where winners got pairs of new Choo-branded sneakers. There are also non-fashion brands with significant presences on Foursquare, including Bravo (they have Millionaire Matchmaker and Real Housewife badges) and MTV. While Gap’s new initiative could mean great things for social media, it’s far from the first time anyone in fashion has thought of partnering with Foursquare. On the plus side, it is a much better idea than that ill-conceived logo they tried to do in October.

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  • Emeka Patrick

    See this is somewhat interesting. However, this (probably) collects only very basic data about the user. What I’d be interested in is figuring out where the appeal of the tradeoff stops, i.e. how much information is a user willing to give up for discounts. Would you give up a ton of personal data for 50% off an item from your favorite brand? Does it make it better if the data isn’t actually personalized and has no name, etc attached. While we all want tailored, customized experiences and discounts, what