• Tue, Apr 12 2011

Franca Sozzani Distinguishes Between Fashion and Style

Models.com has a lengthy, informative interview with Italian Vogue editor-in-chief (for 25 years!) Franca Sozzani, and it’s well worth the read. When asked about her approach to fashion (“beyond the clothes,” if she just naturally encountered it with a more “philosophical” perspective), Sozzani replied by making a distinction between the “two types” of fashion people:

When we talk about fashion, we should have two different points of view. There are people who are very creative—they make fashion. And there are people who are really good with product—they make style. When someone is very creative, even if their work doesn’t sell, follow them. They are opening up a new way. When you are talking about style—or styling—it’s different. Anyone can do styling, and make a “correct” show. But a creative show relies on thousands of little ideas underneath the surface. It’s very important to see this difference. Because instead of focusing on one “fashion,” you focus instead on different women.

Alas, I am not entirely sure what she means. Rather, I’m not certain how it follows that by separating fashion from style, you can “focus instead on different women.” However, it’s gotta be important because Franca Sozzani said it. I tend not to think about things more critically than that when it comes to Italian Vogue.

Make sure to check out the full conversation, in which she talks technology and her longterm collaboration with Steven Meisel.

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  • Lisa

    I think it’s this way: in a show that is more about “style” than “fashion,” the product is more consistently above-par than the creativity, so the designer might have just one creative/fashionable idea produced (stylishly) in various ways on different models. In a show that is more about “fashion” than style, the product might be less consistent in quality, but at least the models, because of the greater creativity of the designer, each stand out more individually than in the show with greater style. (It makes sense, but the phrasing isn’t perfect.)