• Sat, Apr 30 2011

Kate Middleton: More Dress Details

Kate Middleton — now HRH Duchess Catherine — gave the world plenty to talk about yesterday with the big reveal of her wedding dress.

Fortunately for those of us who are experiencing a loss now that the wedding is over, there are still details emerging!

We all know that it was designed by Sarah Burton

for Alexander McQueen, and we’ve all likely seen it from every angle possible.

Now, CBS reports that the handiwork that went into the creation of the dress is as befitting a royal wedding as one might expect. The Chantilly and English lace was applied by the Royal School of Needlework, and those who worked on it had to wash their hands every 30 minutes. Needles were changed every three hours to keep them sharp. Interestingly, it was only when the camera did close-ups of the dress that the lace at the bottom of the train was completely visible. A nice, subtle touch…or, perhaps an indication that I need a new lens prescription.

At any rate, also check out Sarah Burton’s classy statement, which ran in the New York Times (this is the last paragraph of three):

“Catherine looked absolutely stunning today, and the team at Alexander McQueen are very proud of what we have created. The dress was just one component of a spectacular day, and I do not think it is appropriate to comment any further beyond saying that I personally am very grateful and honoured to have been given the opportunity to work on this project, and I wish TRH The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge every good wish for the future.”

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  • Sara

    I love the post about the dress, but I’m wondering what information you can dig up about her wedge shoes (worn the next day, when leaving on the helicopter). Very curious!

  • Eileen

    Nitpicky, so apologizing in advance – she’s not “Duchess Catherine.” She’s “Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Cambridge,” or, more informally, “Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge.” Titles like “Duchess” and “Countess” don’t come before the given name. Titles like “Princess” and “Lady” go before the given name, but you have to be born to them. Princess Anne, for example, is called “Princess Anne” because she was a princess at birth; Diana, Princess of Wales was never properly called “Princess Diana” because she acquired the status of princess through marriage.