Celebrity Admissions Of Body Insecurity: Depressing Or Refreshing?


It’s nothing new for celebrities to claim to have been dorky and insecure as teenagers and/or up to the present day. It either makes me feel empathy for them or roll my eyes like, “whatever you say, Megan Fox,” depending on my pre-existing feelings toward said celebrity. Two recent interviews in particular jumped out at me for the insane disparity between said celebrity’s conventional attractiveness and the bad feelings said celeb claims to have had about herself: English fashion model and “it girl” Daisy Lowe, and computerized torture pop expert Katy Perry.

In a recent interview with In Style, Lowe had this to say:

“It’s taken me seven years to get to the point where I can be comfortable with not being as thin as the rest of them. The public can say, ‘It’s really cool that you’re not conforming to this anorexic ideal’, but then I still have to go and stand next to all of the other girls. I’m not saying that I am big, but when you stand next to a beanpole, you’re going to look like a massive tree trunk. Literally, it’s only in the past six months that I’ve come to terms with it. Before then… it was hard. I used to have private meltdowns all the time.”

Daisy Lowe looks like this:

 

For her part, Katy Perry talked about how weird it felt when she first got those famous breasts of hers in a recent interview with Rolling Stone:

“I started praying for [breasts] when I was, like, 11,” she says. “And God answered that prayer above and beyond, by, like, 100 times, until I was like, ‘Please, stop, God. I can’t see my feet anymore. Please stop!’ I was a lot more rectangular then. I didn’t understand my body. Someone in sixth grade called me ‘Over-the-shoulder boulder holder.’ I didn’t know I could use them. So, what I did was, I started taping them down. How long did I tape them down for? Probably until I was about 19. And, no, I don’t have any psychological pain because of it.

I’m pretty sure you already know what Katy Perry looks like. (If not, she’s up top.) At least she wasn’t scarred for life?

Like I said, I have a few different reactions when I read stuff like this:

1.) How refreshing to hear that Chloe Sevigny has struggled with body issues, just like me! I like her even more now, and will totally buy her fashion line and see her movies in solidarity.

2.) That sneaky Megan Fox is lying about her insecurities to make me like her. Does she think I’m stupid? It’s okay to have been the hot popular girl, lord knows I would’ve been psyched about it if that had been me.

3.) Are we really so effed as a society that Daisy frickin’ Lowe feels fat and gross when standing next to other models? WHAT WILL BECOME OF US???

I realize I don’t know any of these people, and the choice between option one and option two is highly visceral and subjective. But regardless: do you feel the same? What do you think when you hear a sexxxy celeb talk about having issues with her body? Let me know in the comments.

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    • Fabel

      My body is such that I never voice my insecurities to others (even though I have them) because I know the reaction will be something like “Shut the fuck up”. So this is similiar on a larger scale– they just need to consider the audience that’s going to be hearing/reading their comments & realize that (most?) will just roll their eyes. I think their celebrity status may render them a little too out-of-touch to consider this, and they believe these “confessions” will make them relateable.

    • s. york

      While it is nice to find a kindred spirit when it comes to body insecurities, but it’s a little disheartening when that person is ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS. It just seems a little disingenuous to me. Like, how do you think you are so famous? Yes you have talent, but most famous people are talented and also gorgeous. You work in an industry that plays almost solely on aesthetics, so I think it’s safe to say you are attractive. If I see a beautiful woman say that she is ugly, it only makes me think, “well if she’s ugly then I must be f*cking hideous.” It would be better if we all stopped being modest and started being honest with ourselves about how we stack up to the rest of the world.

    • Eileen

      I don’t feel animosity towards the women – everyone has insecurities – but Jessica’s article about January Jones from awhile back pretty much says how I feel about the cultural imperative that beautiful women claim not to feel beautiful.