• Sat, Sep 17 2011

NYC Cabbies No Longer Forced To Display Strip Club Ads Against Their Will

In a victory for devout cabbies the city over, the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission has given drivers who own their own cars veto power over the ads that are displayed on top of their cabs. Up until the ruling, the medallion owner (often not the same person as the driver) had final say over the ads that appeared, an inordinate number of which seemed to be those cheesy strip club ads you see everywhere.

As a generally pro-strip club person, my first instinct was that the cabbies should get over it. I mean, I might not personally endorse every company that advertises on my employers’ websites, but that’s not my decision to make. But when I thought about it a little more, I realized the drivers were in the right. Many drivers’ taxis are their sole vehicle, which means they have to drive them home to their neighborhoods, where their kids live, as well as to religious services, where strip club ads are super embarrassing.

Via The Post:

In one horrifying example, cabby Mohan Singh recalled his 6-year-old granddaughter telling him she wanted to be a “dancer” — after seeing a Flashdancers ad atop his taxi.

That risque ad also prompted his grandnephew to ask what a “gentlemen’s club” was and if he could ever go to one.

You don’t have to be a devout Muslim to feel weird about having to explain what a “gentleman’s club” is to your six-year-old kid. I mean, I am a total moral degenerate who has enjoyed strip clubs on several occasions, but I’m not about to stick a bunch of stripper ads in my 12-year-old cousin’s face, because it’s a bit soon for her to know that a thing called the sex industry exists. (Maybe when she’s 13.)

Basically, nobody’s job should have the ability to make their non-working life miserable, and this change in policy reflects that. Cabbies already have to deal with hedge funders getting beejays in the backseat like there’s not even a living, barfing human being up front; let’s not make them take the shittiest aspects of their work home with them.

What We're Reading:
Share This Post:
  • Eileen

    Glad to hear it. It’s one thing to have to display an ad, while you’re working, on a car that belongs to a company you work for – but if the cabbie owns his own cab it’s total bullshit that he should have to display ads that he can’t take down when he’s not working.

    (This is when I point out that in DC, almost all the cabs are independent, so although you don’t get a screen and they can be pretty terrifying, there’s a lot of undercutting each other for rates and no one has to advertise strip clubs. Competition and small entrepreneurs!)