• Tue, May 1 2012

May Day Gallery: Bad Ass Revolutionary Women

Happy May Day, everyone! If you’re reading this post, I’m already out with my crew taking it to the streets to agitate for social change and maybe, hopefully, also see Rage Against The Machine reunite (a girl can dream). As you may know, in addition to being an ancient Pagan holiday, May Day is International Workers’ Day, a progressive day of action which sees mass demonstrations by workers, students, and citizens all over the world. In such non-revolutionary times as these, it’s easy to wonder what the point is of protesting, as those currently in power in this country are neither going to make any meaningful kind of change (I’m looking at you, Barack Obama), nor are they likely to be overthrown any time soon. But take a zoomed out look at history, and it becomes clear that change can, does, and must happen, and it’s often affected by passionate ladies just like you.

To that end, I’ve assembled a gallery of bad ass revolutionary women. Marvel at their bravery, their moxie, and their ability to keep their hair looking sharp while fighting on the front lines. Do I endorse each and every one of their ideologies and methods? Not necessarily. But I find them all incredibly inspiring, and hope you will, too.

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  • Anna

    Sigh….Change ? Make it soon the banksters have taken over- its scary whats going on in the world now. It seems the banksters rule. Has anyone looked at the OWS movement and the police- the brutality against peaceful protests is shocking! We got to stop them going to war with Iran- thats a disaster waiting to bring untold suffereing everywhere
    Workers rights are under massive attack. There are some interesting
    stuff on that channel Russia today The women journalists on there are awesome – and the view is so not fox news
    - its a real refreshing change from the propaganda machine that dominates.
    I worry where we are headed…

  • MR

    You forgot Emma Goldman. The hippie free love of the ’60s and early ’70s civil and women rights movements found its orgins in her part of the anarchist movement.