• Fri, May 18 2012

10 Awesome Words We Don’t Have In English

words

Considering that the Eskimos have 100 words for snow, it seems pretty amazing that Americans haven’t come up with a word that conveys “a face in need of a fist.” Fortunately, other countries have! (It’s Backpfeifengesicht in German.) Here are ten more great words that we don’t have an English equivalent for:

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  • Ashley Cardiff

    That stock photo is terrifying.

    • Holden

      It’s like Ghost, except Patrick Swayze is.. um… a book.

    • Ashley Cardiff

      OH GOD EXACTLY

  • Fabel

    I LOVE these.

  • Vanessa F.

    Everytime I see that stock photo, I am scared. I’ve seen it three times on and it never fails.

  • Vanessa F.

    Everytime I see that stock photo, I am scared. I’ve seen it three times on and it never fails.

    • Jennifer Wright

      The book man is coming for you.

  • Dave

    I love this list! I use the term “staircase wit” from time to time–some folks get it and some don’t :)

    • jen

      Guess I fall into the “don’t” category. Care to explain?

    • Dave

      It’s that phenomenon of thinking of a clever comeback too late (e.g. on one’s way up the stairs after the conversation).

  • BB

    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eskimo_words_for_snow for a rundown on the myth that “Eskimo” has a lot of words for snow.

  • mel

    Jayus is Indonesian …

  • Kellie

    Toska – Russian Slide 6 of 11 prev next
    To suffer from spiritual anguish without any specific cause.

    In English, translates to “EMO”.

  • Kellie

    Toska – Russian Slide 6 of 11 prev next
    To suffer from spiritual anguish without any specific cause.

    In English, translates to “EMO”.

  • Cat

    “Hygge” is as much Norwegian as Danish

  • Willian

    “Saudade” in Portuguese, is a special word for the feeling that we have when we miss someone. It’s the only language in the world that have a word for that feeling. Romantic, not ?

  • Jessica

    “To call a phone once and hang up, hoping the other person will call back”

    Does no one else call this “pranking”? Instead of getting out the car and ringing the doorbell, just “Prank me when you’re outside!”. Although I guess that doesn’t need a call back.

  • Miscinnamon

    We have this “To call a phone once and hang up, hoping the other person will call back” verb in French, it’s called “biper”, like let the phone “bip” once (one ring in fact) before hanging up, and waiting to be called back.

    it’s a favorite among the always broke teenagers or friends who never seem to have anough credit ^^’

  • Jacob

    Lagom – Swedish

    Not to little nor to much just “lagom”

    (Only in the swedish language!)