Kirstie Alley Sued For “Misleading” Weight Loss Claims

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A little while back, Kelly Preston gave birth (at 48) and promptly dropped 40 lbs., spawning all the breathless People magazine coverage you’d expect. The explanation for Preston’s dramatic weight loss? Not “miracles.” Instead, Preston had Kirstie Alley‘s Scientology-approved juices to thank. …For which Preston served as spokesperson, naturally.

Most people with brains thought the whole thing was very silly and assumed–although somewhat miraculous–that Preston’s weight loss had more to do with a personal trainer, personal chef, and the kind of cushy life that supports daily three hour workouts.

…But not Marina Abramyan. She bought the juice. She also bought into Organic Liason’s marketing campaign, in which Alley attributes her own 100 lb. weight loss to the program. Now Abramyan feels robbed, and she’s suing. Here’s why:

The advertising and marking for the Organic Liason Weight Loss program creates the uniform, false net impression that the product is an FDA approved weight loss product capable of easily causing significant weight loss and caused Defendant Kirstie Alley to lose a whopping 100 pounds. Defendants falsely market the Organic Liason Program as a weight loss aide, and then charge a premium for supplements that are nothing more than run-of-the-mill fiber and calcium supplements.

Abramyan says that Alley’s weight loss was not the result of drinking a shitload of juice, but actually the result of diet and exercise:

Ms. Alley’s weight loss is not due to the Organic Liason program, but rather, is the result of an above average exercise regimen and extremely low calorie diet, including her time on the television program “Dancing with the Stars,” where she spent five to seven hours a day exercising as part of the competition.

She’s seeking unspecified damages.

We’re all for demanding more truth in advertising, but… doesn’t it bother Abramyan to admit that she believed “Scientology sugar water” was going to help her lose weight?

(via TMZ)

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