• Wed, May 22 2013

There’s A Pill To Make Women Want Sex More

ryan gosling
Scientists are working on developing a pill to make women want sex more. To be clear, it’s not actually going to change the way you experience sex. You’re not going going to be more physically aroused or have more orgasms. You’re just going to want it more. I guess up until now, there’s been nothing but sitting around and reading Fifty Shades of Grey, so that’s nice! No one should have to sit around reading Fifty Shades of Grey. The New York Times reports:

The promise of Lybrido and of a similar medication called Lybridos, which Tuiten also has in trials, or of whatever chemical finally wins the race for F.D.A. approval, is that it will be possible to take a next step, to give women the power to switch on lust, to free desire from the obstacles that get in its way. “Female Viagra” is the way drugs like Lybrido and Lybridos tend to be discussed. But this is a misconception. Viagra meddles with the arteries; it causes physical shifts that allow the penis to rise. A female-desire drug would be something else. It would adjust the primal and executive regions of the brain. It would reach into the psyche.

I thought that this seemed like an antiquated notion, like Victorian brides just lying back grimly and thinking of England, but, well, no. No, I guess not. The Times explains:

Dietrich Klusmann, a psychologist at the University of Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany, has provided a glimpse into the bedrooms of longtime couples. His surveys, involving a total of almost 2,500 subjects, comprise one of the few systematic comparisons of female and male desire at progressive stages of committed relationships. He shows women and men in new relationships reporting, on average, more or less equal lust for each other. But for women who’ve been with their partners between one and four years, a dive begins — and continues, leaving male desire far higher. (Within this plunge, there is a notable pattern: over time, women who don’t live with their partners retain their desire much more than women who do.)

The moral seems to be that you can either begin treating your lower levels of desire via the miracles of modern science or you can just… not live with your partner. Or read Fifty Shades of Grey, because I hear that worked for some people.

Picture via Getty

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  • Sean

    I bet if the scientists working on this (and those funding them) spent less time in the lab and more quality time with their respective partners, they wouldn’t need this pill.

    • ash

      It’s a nice thought, but sometimes it isn’t anyone’s fault that one partner has a low sex drive. Anti-depressants, hormone imbalances, stress, general disinterest…sometimes it’s the interest isn’t there at first, but comes later (pun intended, fuck y’all). I really think that if used for the right reasons, this could really help some women.

      I’m sure some of them are just lousy in bed though, for sure.