• Thu, Jul 11 2013

Being A Female Journalist In Syria Sounds Terribly Hard

syria

Have you read Francesca Borri’s piece on being a female journalist in Syria? Do. It will have you hooked from the first sentence.

Borri writes that:

He finally wrote to me. After more than a year of freelancing for him, during which I contracted typhoid fever and was shot in the knee, my editor watched the news, thought I was among the Italian journalists who’d been kidnapped, and sent me an email that said: “Should you get a connection, could you tweet your detention?”

Dude, I get upset if editors do not respond to me immediately when I pitch them ideas about “engagement ring gurus.” I have never felt more awful and entitled. She goes on to say:

And then, of course, I am a woman. One recent evening there was shelling everywhere, and I was sitting in a corner, wearing the only expression you could have when death might come at any second, and another reporter comes over, looks me up and down, and says: “This isn’t a place for women.” What can you say to such a guy? Idiot, this isn’t a place for anyone. If I’m scared, it’s because I’m sane. Because Aleppo is all gunpowder and testosterone, and everyone is traumatized: Henri, who speaks only of war; Ryan, tanked up on amphetamines. And yet, at every torn-apart child we see, they come only to me, a “fragile” female, and want to know how I am. And I am tempted to reply: I am as you are. And those evenings when I wear a hurt expression, actually, are the evenings I protect myself, chasing out all emotion and feeling; they are the evenings I save myself.

What more can I say? Read it, just read it.

Picture via Getty

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  • Cee

    Wow…I would have snapped and be curled up in fetal position somewhere