Kudos To This Portrait Series For Not Erasing LGBTQ Identities While Proving They’re Just Like You

self evident project

The Self Evident Truths Project is an ambitious undertaking to photograph portraits of 10,000 people who identify as being anywhere on the LGBTQI spectrum, or anyone who isn’t “100% straight.” According to the project’s creator iO Tillett Wright, the point of the project is to “humanize a vast community” through these portraits, with the ultimate goal being to print out each portrait and display it on the National Mall in 2016, immediately preceding the next presidential election. You can take a look at some of the 4,000+ portraits they’ve taken on their Instagram page, and it’s really quite a striking collection.

self evident project instagram

Currently, the project team is touring the country, taking portraits and collecting stories. Buzzfeed spoke with Wright, and asked her what she’s learned from taking her show on the road. Her response was illuminating:

“So many things. Mostly about my own prejudices, and keeping those in check and the resilience of the human spirit. People will be true to themselves in the face of the most astonishing odds.”

self evident project picture

What’s especially great about the Self Evident is that it shows the diversity of the LGBTQI community–it doesn’t water things down or erase identities in hopes of assimilation. The idea is not to cover up their differences, but to say that just like heterosexual people, anyone on the LGBTQI spectrum is a person just like you–someone who is unique and defined by many other things besides sexuality. That it’s as diverse a group as heterosexual people, and the mentality of the big bad gay agenda falls apart when you see all these varied, human faces. The gay agenda that we hear so much about doesn’t exist. Here’s a bunch of unique people. That’s all.

Photos: Instagram

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    • Samantha Escobar

      THAT HAT.
      I NEED IT.
      Also, in addition to needing that umbrella hat (really, though), this makes me so happy. I think one of the things that encourages stigma is the simple assumption that we can know exactly what an LGBTQ person “looks like,” when there’s truly no way to know unless that person straight up tells you how they identify.