Cinderella Disney 2015 photoshop Lily James posterWhen the new trailer for 2015’s highly-anticipated release Cinderella came out yesterday, we all ooh‘d and ahh‘d over how gorgeous and exciting it looked. After all, Cinderella’s is a story so many of us grew up with; just the mere glimpse of the iconic glass slipper is enough to send childhood chills through our bodies. Actress Lily James looks so similarly to the 1950 Disney cartoon that it’s almost unnerving–especially when she’s had her actual body digitally altered to look, well, cartoonish-ly thin for the newly-released Cinderella poster.

Here are side-by-side photos of Lily James on the red carpet and Lily James in the Cinderella poster:

Lily James photoshop versus non photoshop before after Marchesa(Left photo: WENN.com)

On the left, she looks like a normal, very attractive human being. On the right, she literally looks like her waist is as thin as her head, possibly thinner. That’s Barbie status on the whack scale, guys.

This was pointed out to us by Shanna Brown, who posted a similar side-by-side comparison on Facebook and had this to say:

Is anyone else as disturbed as I am by the egregious amount of photoshopping done to Lily James’ waistline for the new Cinderella movie? It’s bad enough when it’s animated, but seeing it live is, in a word, creepy. Disney continues to perpetuate an unhealthy standard of beauty that is literally unattainable for anyone who doesn’t wear a corset for 12 hours a day, every day.

She also urged readers to take a look back at the trailer and check out Lily’s waistline there, too.

 Pause it at 1:38 and 1:44. Tell me that is not a CGI-enhanced waistline.
As someone who has personally struggled with body issues her whole life (and continues to), is pursuing a career in which body image is a HUGE percentage of the battle, and continues to watch friends struggle in similar ways, I have to ask: Haven’t we had enough?

Here’s the trailer, for reference.

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20DF6U1HcGQ]

This is not something that Lily has any control over, of course; at best, this is the doing of an overzealous photo editor, and at worst, it was a conscious decision to make a storybook character that millions of kids (and adults, of course) will be seeing this coming spring.

It’s not the same as Photoshopping an already ludicrous image of somebody like Kim Kardashian, who is naked and whose naked photos shouldn’t be being seen by children regardless. It is not Photoshopping fantastical details like a dragon sitting on her shoulder a la Daenerys Targaryen or making her a different height to appear as a hobbit a la Elijah Wood. It is a film that is presenting a childhood ideal of beauty, but even more damaging than ever because here, it’s being presented as a possibility on a real, live human being.