NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 12: Fashion designer Loris Diran (C) makes final touches to models backstage at the Loris Diran fashion show during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2014 at the DiMenna Center on September 12, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 12: Fashion designer Loris Diran (C) makes final touches to models backstage at the Loris Diran fashion show during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2014 at the DiMenna Center on September 12, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)

Remember that whole “unrealistic standardized body image” thing that the modeling industry all but worships? Well, it’s over. We can all go home. There’s no need to fight because Isaac Mizrahi says there aren’t any issues regarding women’s bodies in fashion anymore.

In an interview with HuffPost Style, Mizrahi stated that he no longer feels negatively about how women’s bodies are depicted in fashion. Here are his thoughts [emphasis theirs]:

“I don’t notice girls anymore in the majority who are sickly-looking. Even if they’re tall and thin now, they look healthier to me. Not fat, not fatter, but they just look healthier. I mean this — there was a moment when there was this whole heroin chic thing and it just looked terrible. It just looked terrible! And now everyone points at it and goes, ‘Oh dear, that’s terrible.’

And the girls are encouraged to be thin, but I don’t think they’re encouraged to look like drug addicts anymore. I mean, I’m sure there are some designers who like the girls to look like drug addicts, but not on the whole the way it was for a good 10 years — like, in the middle of the ’90s to around 2002 or so. There was that thing going on, and it was sickening, absolutely sickening. I don’t think it exists anymore.”

Uh, so, women (presumably women, though he refers to them as girls which, to be fair, many of them are) are encouraged to have a specific body type, but that’s not an issue because they’re not encouraged to “look like drug addicts.” Ah, I see. As long as it’s not quite as bad as it was, then it’s okay to tell women that they’re bodies should be different. And it’s not remotely bad that agencies have literally solicited new models outside eating disorder clinics.

Here’s the other thing, Isaac: Not only can drug addicts be overweight–as can women with eating disorders–but the “unhealthily thin” thing wasn’t the entire the issue. The problem is that women are consistently shown one body image ideal: tall, thin, white and with specific proportions. Having thin women model isn’t why we’re all so angry; we just wish that the fashion industry would, at the very least, acknowledge that women can have body types other than 5’10″/size 2.