A model walks the runway at the Alexander Wang fashion show during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2014 at Pier 94 on September 7, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo by Peter Michael Dills/Getty Images)

What’s a better term for “logowhore”?

We prefer to avoid using the word “whore” pejoratively–but, while famewhore can easily be substituted for fameball, there is no other word than “logowhore” that quite neatly conveys the appropriate amount of derision we have for people who bathe themselves in designer logos.

We don’t mean people who wear logos–that’s near impossible to avoid if you own a pair of sunglasses, wear sneakers to the gym, or have ever bought a band shirt after seeing a show. What we mean by logowhore (again, we’d really like to use something else) is a person who has somehow confused “wearing designer logos” with “having style or taste.” Which is to say… Kim Kardashian, her family in its televised entiretyParis Hilton in her heyday, the many intolerable Rich Kids of Instagram, loads of famous people on Twitter/Instagram, practically anyone under the age of 65 with a Louis Vuitton monogram bag, etc.

…And now, alas, the Alexander Wang woman:

A model walks the runway at the Alexander Wang fashion show during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2014 at Pier 94 on September 7, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo by Peter Michael Dills/Getty Images)Yes, what–for a moment’s glance–looks like a bold print is actually the Alexander Wang logo. As for the main photo (at the top of this post), you likely noticed the giant fuck-off WANG on the model’s gloves–but did you notice her shirt?

Moreover, how about a waistband (belt? does it matter?), made of 100% pure logo:

A model walks the runway at the Alexander Wang fashion show during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Spring 2014 at Pier 94 on September 7, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo by Peter Michael Dills/Getty Images)

On a superficial level, Wang is likely offering yet another nod to the currently trending ’90s, to the Calvin Klein underwear campaigns, to the ’90s rappers in heavily branded athleticwear.

But the splash of logos also serve a real purpose–Alexander Wang, since arriving at Balenciaga, is trying to drive a substantial wedge between the streetwear he designs here in New York and all the fancy technique he now devotes to Paris. In other words, Wang is trying to differentiate between his brands. Unfortunately, he’s chosen to do so by apparently rejecting the refinement he’d developed in previous seasons and replacing it with his own name. Hundreds of times. Sometimes in laser cuts.

Though this isn’t a designer’s worst use of his own logo by a long shot, it should not be mistaken for an idea. Consequently, the pieces will no doubt be popular with the kind of style bloggers who care more about conveying privilege than any sort of aesthetic sensibility–but they’re not (and have never been) interested in ideas.

So, since we can’t find a better word for the collection’s demographic than “logowhore,” let’s just go with the most fitting word we can think of for the collection itself: tacky.

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(Photos via Getty)