Topic: hipsters

Gallery: How To Live Without Irony

Gallery: How To Live Without Irony

By now, you have probably read that trollsome New York Times article about how a tiny subset of the population (hipsters) is emblematic of a larger first world problem. (No link on purpose!) As with any time a piece of clickbait like that gets lots of play on the internet, my first impulse was to ignore it and go about my life (which is, ironically, rather enriched by irony), but when I realized many of my Facebook friends had found it “food for thought,” I shot myself in the face realized I’d been doing it wrong all along. My ham-fisted efforts at dressing myself and making my friends laugh were undermining the very fabric of society! In an effort to reform my ways, I’ve compiled a list of handy tips for healthy, happy, irony-free living. I hope you will take them into account as you go about your modern life. #authenticity More »

Jesus, Marilyn Monroe, & Other Pop Culture Icons As Hipsters

Jesus, Marilyn Monroe, & Other Pop Culture Icons As Hipsters

If there are a few major lessons we’ve learned in our time at TheGloss, it’s that people 1) hate hipsters 2) no one can agree on what a hipster is and 3) despite the hate, they fucking love hipster versions of regular things. It’s a study in contradictions, really. Illustrator Fabian Ciraolo trades in the public’s weird, amorphous hatred of the great white pejorative by imagining historical figures (Marilyn Monroe, Che, Dali) and pop culture icons (Captain Planet, Dorothy, Edward Scissorhands) in band shirts and suspenders and tattoos. More »

Would You Stop Liking Something Because A TV Show Made Fun Of It? Should You?

Would You Stop Liking Something Because A TV Show Made Fun Of It? Should You?

In an article recently published on Salon.com, writer Erin Keane explores the Earth shattering implications of the way the “put a bird on it” phenomenon was lovingly skewered by Carrie Brownstein and Fred Armisen on their IFC comedy show Portlandia. In it, she argues that this is “the first comedy sketch to have had a noticeable impact on the buying habits of the people who were both the audience for and the butt of the gag.” It seems to me like this is one of those articles where a writer tries to generalize her own neuroses onto a large group of people in order to justify them. Stop taking yourself so seriously and put a bird on it, girl! More »