Topic: literature

An Object Lesson For Esquire Editors

An Object Lesson For Esquire Editors

Yesterday, an editor at Esquire (Alex Bilmes) talked about the way women are portrayed in Esquire, and said:

“The women we feature in the magazine are ornamental. I could lie to you if you want and say we are interested in their brains as well. We are not. They are objectified..“[Esquire] provide pictures of girls in the same way we provide pictures of cool cars,” he said. “It is ornamental. Women’s magazines do the same thing.”

As Sam pointed out, this is one of those cases where people pretend that someone is being brave by saying an awful thing, when, in reality, they are still doing something awful.

Unless! Unless Esquire editors do not understand what objects are. I have a lesson for them. Take this quiz, and see if you can spot the objects vs. the human people. More »

Book Covers, In Order Of Knee-Jerk Purchaseability

Book Covers, In Order Of Knee-Jerk Purchaseability

Nothing but the title: 10%. Likely inscrutable, almost certainly excessively highbrow.

A person or persons in white robes standing near a pillar: 25%. Might be worth a gamble; might be outrageously dull.

A person or persons in white robes, standing near a pillar, in front of a background with two or more moons in the sky: 80%. Almost certainly excellent. Approaches 100% if there is a cat of unusual size somewhere near the spine.

Part of a woman’s face: 5%. Almost certainly a memoir of worst kind.

Part of a woman’s face, hazily obscured: 1%.

Rippling water: 0%. -10% if there is a woman’s face visible beyond the rippling water (the 10% means I will go watch a very bad movie instead). More »

How To Write A Break-Up Letter Like An Author

How To Write A Break-Up Letter Like An Author

If you need to write a break-up letter (either because you have been broken up with, or because you are a heartbreaker yourself) you’re surely going to want to take advice from some famous authors who do it really, really well. Or badly. Actually, sometimes they are bad at break-up letters, too. And sort of petty! Let’s see what we can draw from this selection of famous author’s break-up letters on Flavorpill: More »

What Is Inside The New Edition Of Fifty Shades Of Grey?

What Is Inside The New Edition Of Fifty Shades Of Grey?

A weird all new edition of Fifty Shades of Grey is flying right at your face, like a tie, or a noose, or whatever other stuff happens in that book that I could never take seriously enough to finish. Just in time for Valentine’s day! I seem equally unlikely to read the new edition of Fifty Shades of Grey as I was with the last version, but, well, I guess some people will. Here is what you are going to find inside it: More »

Gallery: Check Out These Expressive Dioramas Inspired By 19th Century Female Writers

Gallery: Check Out These Expressive Dioramas Inspired By 19th Century Female Writers

If you’ve ever read The Yellow Wallpaper, chances are you already have a terrifying vision of that room permanently etched into your brain, but it’s always neat to see someone else’s take on it, no? Artist Julia Callon has created a series of dioramas that accomplishes that and more. For her Houses Of Fiction series, Callon attempted to replicate the interiors from various works of 19th century lady-literature, spaces which, due to their protagonists’ confinement to the domestic sphere, had great (usually deleterious) effects on their psyches. “The dichotomous representation of women — mad or sane — is crucial to represent in this series,” writes Callon in her artist’s statement. “Therefore, each story is presented as a diptych: one image represents the passive, subservient woman, while the other represents ‘madness.’” Word. More »